My Plague


Introduction

My Plague” is a song by American heavy metal band Slipknot, released as the third single from their second album Iowa on July 8, 2002. The song’s “New Abuse Mix” was featured on the 2002 film Resident Evil.”My Plague” was nominated for the Grammy Award for Best Metal Performance in 2003, though it lost it to Korn’s “Here to Stay”.The song reached number 43 in the UK Singles Chart.

This video is the movie soundtrack, so let see what soundtrack is

A soundtrack can be recorded music accompanying and synchronized to the images of a motion picture, book, television program or video game; a commercially released soundtrack album of music as featured in the soundtrack of a film or TV show; or the physical area of a film that contains the synchronized recorded sound

he term soundtrack now most commonly refers to the music used in a movie (or television show), and/or to an album sold containing that music. Sometimes, the music has been recorded just for the film or album (e.g. Saturday Night Fever). Often, but not always, and depending on the type of movie, the soundtrack album will contain portions of the score, music composed for dramatic effect as the movie’s plot occurs. In 1908, Camille Saint-Saëns composed the first music specifically for use in a motion picture (L’assasinat du duc de Guise), and releasing recordings of songs used in films became prevalent in the 1930s. Henry Mancini, who won an Emmy Award and two Grammys for his soundtrack to Peter Gunn, was the first composer to have a widespread hit with a song from a soundtrack.

By convention, a soundtrack record can contain all kinds of music including music “inspired by” but not actually appearing in the movie; the score contains only music by the original film’s composer(s

n the soundtrack genre there are three types of recordings:

  1. Musical film soundtracks which concentrate primarily on the songs
    (Examples: Grease, Singin’ in the Rain)
  2. Film scores which showcase the background music from non-musicals
    (Examples: Star Wars, Exodus)
  3. Albums of pop songs heard in whole or part in the background of non-musicals
    (Examples: Sleepless in Seattle, When Harry Met Sally)

The first musical film to have a commercially issued soundtrack album was MGM’s film biography of Show Boat composer Jerome Kern, Till the Clouds Roll By. The album was originally issued as a set of four 10-inch 78-rpm records. Only eight selections from the film are included in this album. In order to fit the songs onto the record sides the musical material needed editing and manipulation. This was before tape existed, so the record producer needed to copy segments from the playback discs used on set, the copy and re-copy them from one disc to another adding transitions and cross-fades until the final master was created. Needless to say, it was several generations removed from the original and the sound quality suffered for it. The playback recordings were purposely recorded very “dry” (without reverberation); otherwise it would come across as too hollow sounding in large movie theatres. This made these albums sound flat and boxy.

MGM Records called these “original cast albums” in the style of Decca’s Broadway show cast albums. They also coined the phrase “recorded directly from the soundtrack.” Over the years the term “soundtrack” began to be commonly applied to any recording from a film, whether taken from the actual film soundtrack or re-recorded in studio. The phrase is also sometimes incorrectly used for Broadway cast recordings. While it is correct to call a “soundtrack” a “cast recording” (since it represents the film cast) it is never correct to call a “cast recording” a “soundtrack.” Among their most notable soundtrack albums were those of the films Good News, Easter Parade, Annie Get Your Gun, Singin’ in the Rain, Show Boat, The Band Wagon, Seven Brides for Seven Brothers, and Gigi.

Film score albums did not really become popular until the LP era, although a few were issued in 78-rpm albums. Alex North’s score for the 1951 film version of A Streetcar Named Desire was released on a 10-inch LP by Capitol Records and sold so well that the label later re-released it on one side of a 12-inch LP with some of Max Steiner’s film music on the reverse.

Steiner’s score for Gone with the Wind has been recorded many times, but when the film was reissued in 1967, MGM Records finally released an album of the famous score recorded directly from the soundtrack. Like the 1967 re-release of the film, this version of the score was artificially “enhanced for stereo”. In recent years, Rhino Records has released a 2-CD set of the complete Gone With the Wind score, restored to its original mono sound.

One of the biggest-selling film scores of all time was John Williams’s music from the movie Star Wars. Many film score albums go out-of-print after the films finish their theatrical runs and some have become extremely rare collectors’ items.

In a few rare instances an entire film dialogue track was issued on records. The 1968 Franco Zeffirelli film of Romeo and Juliet was issued as a 4-LP set, as a single LP with musical and dialogue excerpts, and as an album containing only the film’s musical score. The ground-breaking film Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf? was issued by Warner Bros Records as a 2-LP set containing virtually all the dialogue from the film. RCA Victor also issued a 2-LP set what was virtually all the dialogue from the film soundtrack of A Man for All Seasons.

The Shoot and conclusion

Still a footage but it is combine with the movie and it is very dynamic and good to see

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