The making of snuff

The making of snuff

In this video we can see that this is the making of a movie called snuff by the slipknot so we have o understand what is the film crew. A film crew is a group of people hired by a production company for the purpose ofproducing a film or motion picture. Crew are distinguished from cast, the actors who appear in front of the camera or provide voices for characters in the film. Crew are also separate from producers, those who own a portion of either the film company or the film’s intellectual property rights. A film crew is divided into different sectors, each of which specializes in a specific aspect of the production

Production

“Production” is generally not considered a department as such, but rather as a series of functional groups. These include the “front office” staff such as the Production Manager, the Production Coordinator, and their assistants; the accounting staff; the various Assistant Directors; and sometimes the Locations Manager and their assistants. The Director is considered to be a separate entity, not within the departmental structure.

Producer

A film producer creates the conditions for making movies. The producer initiates, coordinates, supervises, and controls matters such as raising funding, hiring key personnel, and arranging for distributors. The producer is involved throughout all phases of the film making process from development to completion of a project.

Executive Producer

An executive producer is usually an investor in the project or just a credit that the filmmaker gave to someone who paid for the credit. There may be multiple executive producers on a project, depending on the financing arrangements. Production Manager The production manager supervises the physical aspects of the production (not the creative aspects) including personnel, technology, budget, and scheduling. It is the production manager’s responsibility to make sure the filming stays on schedule and within its budget. The PM also helps manage the day-to-day budget by managing operating costs such as salaries, production costs, and everyday equipment rental costs. The PM often works under the supervision of a line producer and directly supervises the Production Coordinator.

 

Unit Manager

The unit manager fulfills the same role as the production manager but for secondary “unit” shooting. In some functional structures, the unit manager subsumes the role of the Transport Coordinator.

 

Production Coordinator

The Production Coordinator is the information nexus of the production, responsible for organizing all the logistics from hiring crew, renting equipment, and booking talent. The PC is an integral part of film production.

 

Post-production supervisor

Post Production Supervisors are responsible for the post production process, during which they maintain clarity of information and good channels of communication between the Producer, Editor, Supervising Sound Editor, the Facilities Companies (such as film labs, CGI studios and negative cutters) and the Production Accountant. Although this is not a creative role, it is pivotal in ensuring that the film’s Post Production budget is manageable and achievable, and that all deadlines are met. Because large amounts of money are involved, and most of a film’s budget is spent during Production, the Post Production period can often be difficult and challenging.

 

Director

The director is responsible for overseeing the creative aspects of a film, including controlling the content and flow of the film’s plot, directing the performances of actors, organizing and selecting the locations in which the film will be shot, and managing technical details such as the positioning of cameras, the use of lighting, and the timing and content of the film’s soundtrack. Though the director wields a great deal of power, they are ultimately subordinate to the film’s producer or producers. Some directors, especially more established ones, take on many of the roles of a producer, and the distinction between the two roles is sometimes blurred.

 

First Assistant Director

The first assistant director (1st AD) assists the production manager and director. The ultimate aim of any 1st AD is to ensure the film comes in on schedule while maintaining a working environment in which the director, principal artists (actors) and crew can be focused on their work. They oversee day-to-day management of the cast and crew scheduling, equipment, script, and set. A 1st AD may also be responsible for directing background action for major shots or the entirety of relatively minor shots, at the director’s discretion.

 

Second Assistant Director

The second assistant director (2nd AD) is the chief assistant of the 1st AD and helps carry out those tasks delegated to the 1st AD. The 2nd AD may also direct background action and extras in addition to helping the 1st AD with scheduling, booking, etc. The 2nd AD is responsible for creating Call Sheets that let the crew know the schedule and important details about the shooting day. In Canadian and British functional structures there are 3rd ADs and even Trainee ADs; in the American system there are 2nd 2nd ADs.

 

Production Assistant

A production assistant assists the first assistant director with set operations. Production assistants, almost always referred to as PAs, also assist in the production office with general tasks.

 

Script Supervisor

Also known as the “continuity person”, the script supervisor keeps track of what parts of the script have been filmed and makes notes of any deviations between what was actually filmed and what appeared in the script. They make notes on every shot, and keep track of props, blocking, and other details to ensure continuity from shot to shot and scene to scene. The Script Supervisor’s notes are given to the Editor to expedite the editing process. The script supervisor works very closely with the director on set.

 

Stunt Coordinator

Where the film requires a stunt, and involves the use of stunt performers, the stunt coordinator will arrange the casting and performance of the stunt, working closely with the director.

 

Casting Director

Chooses the actors for the characters of the film by inviting the actors to a practice for the script called an audition.

Additional production credits

Since the turn of the 21st century, several additional professionals are now routinely listed in the production credits on most major motion pictures.

 

Legal Counsel

Entertainment lawyers negotiate contracts, clear licensing rights for any intellectual property used in the film, obtain tax credits from local governments, and take care of immigration paperwork when cast and/or crew cross international borders to shoot on location.

 

Accountant

Production accountants manage the money and ensure the production comes in on budget and everyone gets paid. The industry is notorious for unusual accounting methods which are collectively labeled Hollywood accounting.

 

Insurance Broker

Due to the rising cost of computer-generated special effects, shooting on location, and A-list talent, major motion picture budgets continue to set new records each decade. As a result, most investors will not commit to financing a film unless an insurer can be found to protect them against the risk that the film ultimately cannot be released as a result of a total catastrophe such as total loss of film negatives (or digital media), death of the director or stars during production, natural disasters destroying the sets, and so on. Insurance brokers help arrange for the insurance coverage that in turn makes a production financially feasible.

 

The Conclusion

This video was created how to make a short movie and a video clip,slipknot is creative you can see it at snuff

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